One's Inspiration

This is an artblog where random inspiring and interesting references or tutorials concerning art, animation are reblogged and posted.
I keep a lot of other material as well, like information that might come in handy writing novels, bits of history, funny stories and what ifs, etc etc.
nazerine:

unnaturalist:

finger of Gallieo

dead for 400 years and still flipping off old man pope. you go finger of galileo. stick it to the man

nazerine:

unnaturalist:

finger of Gallieo

dead for 400 years and still flipping off old man pope. you go finger of galileo. stick it to the man

spaceplasma:

Dirty thunderstorms

A dirty thunderstorm (also, Volcanic lightning) is a weather phenomenon that occurs when lightning is produced in a volcanic plume. A study in the journal Science indicated that electrical charges are generated when rock fragments, ash, and ice particles in a volcanic plume collide and produce static charges, just as ice particles collide in regular thunderstorms.

(via finaldelta)

rhamphotheca:

The Trouble With Turtles: Paleontology at a Crossroads

Scientists debate whether modern turtles are more closely related to snakes and lizards or birds and crocodiles.

by Naomi Lubick

Traditional paleontological research has been upended over the past few decades, as less traditional fields, such as genomics and developmental biology, have weighed in on vertebrate evolution. Researchers have examined the lingering color elements in dinosaur feathers, the genetics of woolly mammoths, purported proteins and blood from dinosaurs, and other ancient fossil signatures using modern tools. But the question of turtle evolution has remained resistant to both traditional and novel methods.

More than 300 species of turtles exist today, but where they came from isn’t entirely clear. Turtles are the last big living vertebrate group to be placed firmly on the tree of life, and the arguments are getting messy. Three fields in particular — paleontology, developmental biology and microbiology/genomics — disagree about how, and from what, turtles may have evolved.

Traditional paleontologists have placed turtles, which are indisputably reptiles, in relation to a group of mostly extinct reptilian animals called anapsids, which don’t have holes in their skulls; however, analyses in the 1990s put turtles in the diapsid camp, which originally had two holes in their skulls, and closer to modern reptiles like snakes. Morphology places them near the group made up of lizards and birds and crocodiles…

(read more: EARTH Magazine)

images: T - Kathleen Cantner, AGI.; Bottom 3 - Tyler Lyson, NMNH

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms
by Mary Bates
Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.
Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.
They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.
1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…
(read more: Wired Science)
photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

rhamphotheca:

 The Creature Feature: 10 Fun Facts About Velvet Worms

by Mary Bates

Velvet worms, otherwise known as Onychophora, are reclusive little animals that have changed very little in the last 500 million years.

Scientists have described some 180 modern species. They can be found in moist, dark places all around the tropics and Australia and New Zealand. Smaller species are less than an inch long, while the largest reach lengths of about 8 inches.

They come in a dazzling array of colors and exhibit some pretty weird and complex behaviors. I’m sure you’ll be just as charmed by them as I am.

1. Velvet worms have hydrostatic skeletons. Velvet worms don’t have hard exoskeletons like arthropods. Instead, their fluid-filled body cavities are covered in a thin skin and kept rigid by their pressurized internal liquids. They move by the alteration of fluid pressure in the limbs as they extend and contract along the body…

(read more: Wired Science)

photo: Peripatoides novazealandiae by Frupus, via Flickr.

wordsandchocolate:

I made a slideshow about how to create a fictional character… I got most of the information from the ‘start writing fiction’ (free) course on the OpenUniversity website and found it incredibly useful so here’s a visual version for you :)

(via finaldelta)

animeclay:

ASK

(I’ve been seeing ASK’s art going around unsourced/uncredited far too much for comfort. Don’t support that.)

(via arrrrtful)

lifeofasomali:

Somali women in traditional garbasaar; a colorful shawl mainly worn by married women. 

lifeofasomali:

Somali women in traditional garbasaar; a colorful shawl mainly worn by married women. 

(via glust)

mucholderthen:

Solar Spectra of the Most Common Elements
(by decreasing abundance)    
1 Hydrogen H
2 Helium He
3 Lithium Li
8 Oxygen O
6 Carbon C
7 Nitrogen N
10 Neon Ne
12 Magnesium Mg
14 Silicon Si
16 Sulfur S
26 Iron Fe
13 Aluminum Al
20 Calcium Ca
18 Argon Ar
11 Sodium Na
36 Krypton Kr
38 Strontium Sr
54 Xenon Xe
56 Barium Ba

SOURCE: Color spectra
Via life-the-universe-everything

(via finaldelta)

unexplained-events:

Derweze, also known as the door to hell, is a 70 meter wide hole in the middle of the Karakum desert in Turkmenistan. The hole was formed in 1971 when a team of soviet geologists had their drilling rig collapse when they hit a cavern filled with natural gas. In an attempt to avoid poisonous discharge, they decided to burn it off, thinking that the gas would be depleted in only a few days. Derweze is still burning today 

(via finaldelta)

rhamphotheca:

This Texas Wasp Moth, Horama panthalon, in Northeastern Mexico, just like cannot fucking… I mean for christ sake WE ARE JUST GOING TO THE GROCERY STORE, not the club… can you like tone it down for one fucking day Liberace?!
photo by Francisco Hernández
(via: Entomology on Facebook)

rhamphotheca:

This Texas Wasp Moth, Horama panthalon, in Northeastern Mexico, just like cannot fucking… I mean for christ sake WE ARE JUST GOING TO THE GROCERY STORE, not the club… can you like tone it down for one fucking day Liberace?!

photo by Francisco Hernández

(via: Entomology on Facebook)